Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding
Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding


take action
our home page
ten steps to successful breastfeeding
breastfeeding news
breastfeeding
ten facts on breastfeeding
baby-friendly hospital initiative
breastfeeding and hiv/aids
benefits of breastfeeding
facts for feeding
frequently asked questions
resources
links
Initiation of Breastfeeding by Breast Crawl
site map
contact us

World Health Organization's infant feeding recommendation

Training
Breastfeeding
BFHI
HIV

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0

 

 
Breastfeeding

A non-breastfed child is 14 times more likely to die in the first six months
than an exclusively breastfed child, according to The Lancet.

Breast milk gives a baby everything they need
and costs only what it takes to feed the mother.


Why it is important to share and act on this information


Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding Babies who are breastfed are generally healthier and achieve optimal growth and development compared to those who are fed formula milk.

If the vast majority of babies were exclusively fed breastmilk in their first six months of life – meaning only breastmilk and no other liquids or solids, not even water – it is estimated that the lives of at least 1.2 million children would be saved every year. If children continue to be breastfed up to two years and beyond, the health and development of millions of children would be greatly improved.

Infants who are not breastfed are at an increased risk of illness that can compromise their growth and raise the risk of death or disability. Breastfed babies receive protection from illnesses through the mother's milk.

Breastfeeding is the natural and recommended way of feeding all infants, even when artificial feeding is affordable, clean water is available, and good hygienic conditions for preparing and feeding infant formula exist.

If a mother is HIV-positive, there is a risk that she can transmit HIV to her baby through breastfeeding. Counselling can help her carefully weigh the risks and make an informed decision on which feeding option is best for her baby and most manageable for her.

Almost every mother can breastfeed successfully. All mothers, particularly those who might lack the confidence to breastfeed, need the encouragement and practical support of the baby's father and their families, friends and relatives. Health workers, community workers, women's organizations and employers can also provide support.

Everyone has the right to information about the benefits of breastfeeding and the risks of artificial feeding. Governments have a responsibility to provide this information. Communities as well as media and other channels of communication can play a key role in promoting breastfeeding.

Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding

Every facility providing maternity services and care for newborn infants should:

watch the video step 1   step 2   step 3   step 4   step 5   step 6   step 7   step 8   step 9   step 10


  1. Have a written breastfeeding policy that is routinely communicated to all health care staff.
     
  2. Train all health care staff in skills necessary to implement this policy.
     
  3. Inform all pregnant women about the benefits and management of breastfeeding.
     
  4. Help mothers initiate breastfeeding within a half-hour of birth.
     
  5. Show mothers how to breastfeed and how to maintain lactation, even if they should be separated from their infants.
     
  6. Give newborn infants no food or drink other than breast milk unless medically indicated.
     
  7. Practice rooming-in - allow mothers and infants to remain together - 24 hours a day.
     
  8. Encourage breastfeeding on demand.
     
  9. Give no artificial teats or pacifiers (also called dummies or soothers) to breastfeeding infants.
     
  10. Foster the establishment of breastfeeding support groups and refer mothers to them on discharge from the hospital or clinic.

Watch the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding videos as a playlist - YouTubeWatch the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding videos as a playlist - YouTube

See the video in MarathiWatch the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding video in Marathi



>> Did you ever wonder what's in... ? Breastmilk - Formula


Understanding International Policy on HIV and Breastfeeding: a comprehensive resource

Understanding International Policy on HIV and Breastfeeding: a comprehensive resource "Understanding International Policy on HIV and Breastfeeding: a comprehensive resource" is a resource which aims to clarify the confusion which has arisen during the last decade due to changing HIV and infant feeding guidance. The resource is intended for policy-makers, breastfeeding advocates, national breastfeeding committees, public health advocates, women's health activists and others working in the community.

The resource also summarises up-to-date scientific evidence as at the end of 2012. Research emerging between WHO's 2006 and 2010 guidance documents showed conclusively that maternal/infant ARV regimens during pregnancy and breastfeeding greatly reduce vertical transmission of HIV; and that exclusive and continued breastfeeding significantly improves overall HIV-free survival.

Section 1 | Section 2 | Section 3 | Section 4 | Section 5 | Section 6 | Envelope | CD Cover


21 Dangers of Infant Formula

21 Dangers of Infant FormulaPoster by World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, July 2012
download pdf 2 pp. 4.0 MB
The poster shares information on the effects that Formula companies do not want you to know about. The evidence based references and sources of information are presented on the back of the poster.




HealthPhone Essentials: Educational Videos for Basic Health Knowledge
Early and Exclusive Breastfeeding
Hand Washing with Soap and Water
Use of Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) and Zinc
Routine Immunization
Initiation of Breastfeeding by Breast Crawl


The Benefits of Breastfeeding

The Benefits of Breastfeeding - Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation



Breastfeeding
Facts for Life: Breastfeeding - factsforlife.org

Why it is important  •   All key messages  •   Resources

Supporting information for key messages: 1  •   2  •   3  •   4  •   5  •   6  •   7  •   8



The Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a global effort by UNICEF and the World Health Organization to implement practices that protect, promote and support breastfeeding. It aims to ensure that all maternities, whether free standing or in a hospital, become centers of breastfeeding support. Hospitals and maternity units set a powerful example for new mothers.

The "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" are the foundation of BFHI and summarize the maternity practices necessary to support breastfeeding. A maternity facility can be designated 'baby-friendly' when it does not accept free or low-cost breastmilk substitutes, feeding bottles or teats, and has implemented these 10 specific steps to support successful breastfeeding.



World Breastfeeding Week — Breastfeeding Support: Close to MothersWorld Breastfeeding Week — 1- 7 August 2013 — Breastfeeding Support: Close to Mothers

This year's World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) theme, 'Breastfeeding Support: Close to Mothers', highlights Breastfeeding Peer Counselling. Even when mothers are able to get off to a good start, all too often in the weeks or months after delivery there is a sharp decline in breastfeeding rates, and practices, particularly exclusive breastfeeding. The period when mothers do not visit a healthcare facility is the time when a community support system for mothers is essential. Continued support to sustain breastfeeding can be provided in a variety of ways. Traditionally, support is provided by the family. As societies change, however, in particular with urbanization, support for mothers from a wider circle is needed, whether it is provided by trained health workers, lactation consultants, community leaders, or from friends who are also mothers, and/or from fathers/partners.



   5 March, 2013
 
  our main page ten steps to successful breastfeeding breastfeeding news baby-friendly hospital initiative benefits of breeastfeeding facts for feeding frequently asked questions about breastfeeding breastfeeding resources breastfeeding related links site map

HealthPhone: Health, Medical Training Videos

The Mother and Child Health and Education Trust - our portals and sites
 
Another child will die in ....
HealthPhone™
Guide to Child Care
imagine
Community Video
HealthRadio
Kyunki-Jeena Issi Ka Naam Hai
Rehydration Project
Successful Breastfeeding
Disaster Relief
Community Radio
AIDS action
Polio Free
Untouchability
Health Education to Villages
Breast Crawl
Education for Girls
A Simple Solution
Diarrhoea: 7 Point Plan
Rights of the Child
Mother and Child Nutrition
Mother and Child Health
Facts for Life
Education for Boys
Child Protector
HealthTube